Abstract

Culture, Perception/Belief about Death and their Implication to the Awareness and Control of the Socio-Economic, Environmental and Health Factors Surrounding Lower Life Expectancy in Nigeria

Death is not a new phenomenon in the history of humanity however, what matters is the perception about it among every population and their attitude towards the socio-economic, environmental and health factors surrounding it. The present paper focuses on examining the concept of death across generations and the religiously and culturally informed attitude and belief towards it; the implication of this to the knowledge about and control of the socio-economic, environmental and Health factors surrounding life expectancy in traditional African societies such as Nigeria. The paper with regard to physical explanations of the factors surrounding lower life expectancy among the traditional African people such as Nigerians bring to limelight the implication of superstitious belief about death to the awareness and control of the socio-economic, environmental and health factors surrounding lower life expectancy among the population.


Author(s):

Okafor Samuel Okechi



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